(BLOOMINGTON) – The trial of a man accused of torturing and confining his son in a Bloomington hotel room before the boy died has been rescheduled.

12-year-old Eduardo Posso was chained, beaten, and shocked with an electric dog collar, then left alone in the bathroom of the Economy Inn in Bloomington for weeks.

By the time his father took him to the hospital, Eduardo was so neglected that he passed away.

His father, 32-year-old Luis Posso, claimed the boy slipped and fell in the shower, but authorities said the boy was murdered.
Monroe County detectives arrested his father, 32-year-old Luis Eduardo Posso, Jr., and his stepmother, 25-year-old Dayan Median Flores, in connection with his death. They face charges of murder, neglect of a dependent resulting in death, neglect of a dependent with cruel confinement involved, criminal confinement with bodily injury and battery resulting in bodily injury to a person under the age of 14.

Both are being held without bond in the Monroe County Correctional Center. The Monroe County Prosecutor Office filed a Notice of Intent to seek life imprisonment without parole.

Posso’s trial was set to begin on April 9. It has been rescheduled for May 12th at 8:30 a.m. in Monroe Circuit Court 3 with Judge Marc Kellams presiding.

Hospital officials say Eduardo showed multiple signs of abuse and starvation. The boy was severely emaciated and weighed only 50 to 55 pounds, according to Coroner Joni Shields. She ruled he died of starvation saying he was “severely emaciated” and had bruises all over his body.

Police examined the couples’ phones and found videos of Eduardo restrained in a bathtub. The video shows other and have children and Flores coming and going in the bathroom and paying no attention to the boy. Posso even took a selfie in the bathroom with his son restrained in the background, police said.

Their three other children, a 9-year-old girl, a 5-year-old boy, and a 2-year-old boy, were placed in the care of Child Protection Services. Officials say they appeared to be healthy.

Flores and Posso worked as independent contractors for a circus and passed out event flyers for a living. They traveled to different cities and states for work.